Wildlife Wonders

Australia is often associated with its iconic animals, from the kangaroo to the koala. Venture into the Outback and you’ll discover a whole world of quirky, adorable and sometimes downright bizarre creatures. We can help take you beyond the zoos to reveal authentic experiences with the incredible animals of Western Australia.

Find a Furry Friend

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Quokka: The happiest animal on Earth

Resembling a cross between a small kangaroo and a chipmunk, the quokka’s reputation as the world’s happiest animal comes from its ever-present smile. Wild quokkas are abundant on Rottnest Island, just west of Fremantle, with numbers soaring to nearly 12,000. We can arrange for you to take a guided Quokka Walk revealing the lifestyle of these nocturnal herbivores in their natural habitat. A “quokka selfie” is a must so have your camera ready!

 

tte32_wa_102129Numbat: The banded anteater

Another marsupial of Western Australia — recognizable for its slender, striped body and elongated tail — the tiny banded anteater is called by its Aboriginal name: a numbat. Now considered an endangered species, they can be found only two-and-a-half hours from Perth in the Dryandra Woodland at the Barna Mia animal sanctuary.

 

tte32_wa_100877Black-footed Rock Wallaby: The shy marsupial

Good fortune is on your side if you’re able to see this rare wallaby. Aside from diminishing populations, they live in caves and cliffs for protection from predators. We can help you catch a glimpse of this agile marsupial hopping from rock to rock on a guided boat tour along Yardie Creek Gorge in Cape Range National Park. Keep an eye on the coast to spot the tiny, kangaroo-like creature — their feet are textured to keep them from slipping on the rocks.

 

Flock Together with Brids of a Feather

tte32_wa_103190-1200x560Black Swan: The state bird

You can’t miss the black swan in Western Australia: it’s the state’s emblem, appearing on its flag and coat of arms. With bright red bills and long, graceful necks, these striking birds are surprising romantics. They mate for life, reuniting every year to breed and raising their cygnets in large family-like flocks.

 

tte32_wa_102395-1200x560Blue-Winged Kookaburra: The fancy foul

The beautiful blue-winged kookaburra is a close relative of the laughing kookaburra, but appears much brighter in color. Birdwatchers can spot these vibrantly feathered creatures along the coast of Western Australia. View them up-close along with the odd-looking gang-gang cockatoo and gangly bush thick-knee at Caversham Wildlife Park in Whiteman, which features about 200 species and over 2,000 animals in total!

 

tte32_wa_istock_000039337988-1200x619Quokka: The happiest animal on Earth

Resembling a cross between a small kangaroo and a chipmunk, the quokka’s reputation as the world’s happiest animal comes from its ever-present smile. Wild quokkas are abundant on Rottnest Island, just west of Fremantle, with numbers soaring to nearly 12,000. We can arrange for you to take a guided Quokka Walk revealing the lifestyle of these nocturnal herbivores in their natural habitat. A “quokka selfie” is a must so have your camera ready!

 

tte32_wa_tourism_104582Emu: The tall feathered friend

With some standing at over six feet tall and weighing up to 120 pounds, the emu is Australia’s largest native bird. In Toodyay, just over 50 miles from Perth, you can walk beside these giant birds and their chicks at the world’s oldest emu farm. We can arrange a private tour with Kip and Charmian, the husband-and-wife team who started the emu farm in 1976.

 

Marine Life Encounters

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Dugong: The enormous vegetarian

You’ve heard of manatees, now meet the gentle dugong. Resembling something akin to a floating potato, they can be found grazing on sea grass in the warm waters of Shark Bay and Ningaloo marine parks. Since this “sea cow” cannot hold its breath underwater for long, you can often spot them coming to the surface for air. We can help you choose your tour, whether you want to view them from a glass-bottom boat or take a private charter helicopter to see the spectacular scenery from above.

 

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Bottlenose Dolphins: Bunbury’s friendliest locals

There are only a few places on Earth where you can interact with wild dolphins, and only one place in Australia: the shores of Koombana Bay in Bunbury. An interaction zone was established in 1990 in the same spot where a local resident, Evelyn, began feeding dolphins in 1960s. After her passing, the dolphins continued to visit, and they still do today. Go swimming with them, take a boat tour or simply greet them at the shoreline!

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Whale Shark: The world’s largest fish

Although massive, whale sharks are docile creatures. Swim alongside these gentle giants at the World Heritage-listed Ningaloo Reef, where they migrate every spring to feed on the abundant supply of plankton. At up to 52.5 feet long, swimming next to these gentle giants is a truly once-in-a-lifetime experience.

 

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Crocodile: The incredible reptile

Saltys” is the local name for the massive saltwater crocodile weighing as much as 2,200 pounds and stretching as long as 23 feet. Venture to the Kimberley region in the north for a look at the world’s largest living reptile. We’ll arrange for an expert guide to point out these crocs in the wild, divulging fascinating tidbits along the way, such as their calculated method to capture prey. Or, view them on your own at Broome’s Malcolm Douglas Wilderness Wildlife Park, where daily feeding tours allow you to witness the reptile’s voracious appetite.

 

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